Project Description

OFELIA GUADALUPE SAAVEDRA ARCHUNDIA

Lawyer

My connection with the UK dates back several generations with a family charmed by British history and culture. I was named after my grandmother Ofelia, after Shakespeare’s Ophelia in Hamlet. My brother is called Horacio, after Hamlet’s friend Horatio.

Being a native of Toluca, which mirrors the weather of Britain, I was somewhat prepared when I studied in London. The history, culture, diversity, tradition, talent, and innovation were essential elements in my motivation to stay in London when I began my professional life. As a student at King’s College London, the London School of Economics and Political Science, as well as Goodenough College, were essential for a pleasant and inclusive integration, with outstanding opportunities such as a face-to-face visit of Queen Elizabeth II when I proudly wore a traditional Mexican gown.

My career path is, in some ways, similar to many people: I joined a management consulting firm and learned how to help companies solve strategic problems, deliver change and growth which then led me to legal project management. This professional background has provided me with skills that help both my clients and myself adapt to our rapidly changing world, learning how to influence different cultures and travel around the world.

Professionally, I bring projects back to Mexico. One that stands out was leading a collaboration of strategy for the Centre for Public Impact of Boston Consulting Group BCG with various government authorities in Mexico. Recently, as a member of the core group of Women Leaders in Law, of the Law Society of England and Wales, I set up a collaboration for projects to promote greater gender equality and diversity in Mexico.

My identity is totally Mexican. I always make sure to have 100% Mexican ingredients so that I can follow my mother’s recipes. I often find myself in debates about the authenticity of Mexican gastronomy.

Even though I took British articulation lessons, I get compliments and encouragement to keep a Mexican-British accent. Like many Mexicans, I attend Sunday mass and follow traditions such as setting the altar for the Day of the Dead and the Nativity.

Mauricio Munguía